Hacks And Dons: Teaching at the London University Journalism School, 1919-1939, Its Origins, Development and Influence [Illustrated Paperback] by Dr. Fred Hunter, 345 pages, 35 B/W illustrations, ISBN-13: 978-0954289942, Language: English. Subject: History and Media Studies £24.99. Publication 1st December 2012.

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A history of the first university journalism course in Britain between 1919 and 1939, that gave groundings to some of the leading journalists and national newspaper editors from the 1920s until the millennium. Many course graduates, guided by teaching pioneers Dr George Harrison, Joan Skipsey and Tom Clarke, became successful authors, including Leila Berg, Elizabeth Bowen, Elizabeth Ferrars, Stella Gibbons, Yvonne Kapp, Betty Miller, Penelope Mortimer, and Ruth Tomalin.

HACKS: ‘A COMMON DRUDGE ESPECIALLY A LITERARY DRUDGE; HENCE A POOR WRITER, A MERE SCRIBBLER (1700)’ DONS: ‘TUTOR OR FELLOW OF A COLLEGE AT OXFORD OR CAMBRIDGE.’ ‘SOMETHING WITH A LOUD, AFFECTED VOICE, AIRING ITS KNOWLEDGE’ – JOHN CAREY

Dr. Fred Hunter completed the first Journalism PhD at the City University under the supervison of social historian Lord Asa Briggs and the legendary former editor of the Sunday Times, Sir Harold Evans. This thesis and research project is the basis of this book. Dr. Hunter was educated at Cambridge University, co-run a record label recording significant 20th century poets, and worked at the Central Office of Information before becoming the first Editor of UK Independent Radio News. He founded the broadcast journalism course at the London College of Printing later London College of Communication.

Contents:

Chapter 1: Tom Clarke - Pioneer of Teaching British Journalists;

Chapter 2: The Evolution of the Modern Journalist 1880-1930;

Chapter 3: Some Aspects of Education and Training;

Chapter 4: The Emergence and Development of Education for Journalism in Britain: John Churton Collins and the Birmingham University Scheme for Educating Journalists;

Chapter 5: The Introduction of Government Education Grants for Students on Further and Higher Education Courses;

Chapter 6: The University of London Diploma for Journalism: The Educational Background and Aims of the Course; Illustrations;

Chapter 7: Editorial Attitudes Towards News Reporting Revealed in Clarke's Lecture Notes;

Chapter 8: Developments in the Practical Journalism Component of the Diploma for Journalism 1935-1939 including a Termly Examination from 1937 onwards;

Chapter 9: The influence of the Diploma for Journalism on the National Union of Journalists and future journalism training and education;

Chapter 10: The importance and meaning of the London University Diploma for Journalism course;

Chapter 11: Young Women Learning Journalism at London University, 1919-1939;

Appendices; Bibliography; Index

Companion web resources for the publication.

Appendix XLII Page 302

 

Track One: Interview by Dr. Fred Hunter with Mr. Geoffrey Pinnington at the offices of the Sunday People 1978.

 

Track Two: Interview by Dr. Fred Hunter with Ruth Tomalin 1992.

 

Letter by Dr. Fred Hunter to British Journalism Review 1996 concerning Geoffrey Cox's view of Tom Clarke.

 

Dr. Fred Hunter

 

Dr. Fred Hunter (Centre) at party celebrating the 25th birthday of Britain's first licensed independent radio station, LBC in London

 

 

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